"But Link’s Awakening is not so black-and-white. Link doesn’t save the world at the end of his 1993 Game Boy misadventure. He simply wakes up, a dreamer troubled by nightmares, and like any figure from a dream—whether they’re just some Jungian archetype or just so much mental debris—it’s not clear he’s doing the right thing.”

Link’s Awakening is what happens when Zelda trades heroism for the murky morality of dreams


“Riven is still careful to let you investigate the realm in your own time. The fleeting glimpses of humanity, though, naturally create an urge to meet some of these folks. Why won’t they be your friend? That’s for you to figure out. The emptiness that was taken as a matter of fact in Myst is part of the puzzle in Riven; it enriches the tensions of the game.”

—Our latest “Special Topics In Gameology” series is about emptiness in games. Myst uses it to calm you; its sequel, Riven, uses it to provoke you. High-res

Riven is still careful to let you investigate the realm in your own time. The fleeting glimpses of humanity, though, naturally create an urge to meet some of these folks. Why won’t they be your friend? That’s for you to figure out. The emptiness that was taken as a matter of fact in Myst is part of the puzzle in Riven; it enriches the tensions of the game.”

—Our latest “Special Topics In Gameology” series is about emptiness in games. Myst uses it to calm you; its sequel, Riven, uses it to provoke you.