This week’s Gameological Q&A comes from reader Christopher Arp:

I was recently bragging to some friends that I had never been truly frightened by a game. Sure, any game can make me jump with a loud noise or sudden visual. But deep, creeping fear? That’s less likely. Not even Dead Space—a game that creates suspense more than anything approaching terror—gets to me. But then I remembered an ancient, excellent PC game called The Dark Eye. Eyeless clay-looking characters? Playable Edgar Allan Poe stories? Bone-chilling voice acting? My bowels, they tremble at the memory. What games, if any, have terrified you?

Our writers weighed in, and now we want to hear from you.
—Gameological Q&A: What games have truly terrified you? High-res

This week’s Gameological Q&A comes from reader Christopher Arp:

I was recently bragging to some friends that I had never been truly frightened by a game. Sure, any game can make me jump with a loud noise or sudden visual. But deep, creeping fear? That’s less likely. Not even Dead Space—a game that creates suspense more than anything approaching terror—gets to me. But then I remembered an ancient, excellent PC game called The Dark Eye. Eyeless clay-looking characters? Playable Edgar Allan Poe stories? Bone-chilling voice acting? My bowels, they tremble at the memory. What games, if any, have terrified you?

Our writers weighed in, and now we want to hear from you.

Gameological Q&A: What games have truly terrified you?


"In the 2000 game, the biggest threats are oppression and harassment from authority figures. In the 2008 game, bullying and toxicity threaten to destroy the culture from within. The kids of World are placed in a direct competition that can only have one winner, forcing them to view each other as threats. They also have to contend with the Reapers, older teenage enforcers who target players for sport. In World’s vision of Shibuya, kids their own age are a threat, and the older kids are a source of fear and persecution instead of guidance and support.”

—For Our Consideration: Two ultra-hip Japanese games of the 2000s showcased youth culture’s uplifting power High-res

"In the 2000 game, the biggest threats are oppression and harassment from authority figures. In the 2008 game, bullying and toxicity threaten to destroy the culture from within. The kids of World are placed in a direct competition that can only have one winner, forcing them to view each other as threats. They also have to contend with the Reapers, older teenage enforcers who target players for sport. In World’s vision of Shibuya, kids their own age are a threat, and the older kids are a source of fear and persecution instead of guidance and support.”

For Our Consideration: Two ultra-hip Japanese games of the 2000s showcased youth culture’s uplifting power

"The pyrotechnic stress of spy-craft blooms when secret agents act on the fly, but there needs to be a plan in the first place before it can go off the rails. Something has to go right before it can go wrong. CounterSpy’s got the moves, the look, and the sound, but it doesn’t have the smarts, the tension, or the carefully crafted plans to live up to spydom’s best. Going in without a plan is built into the game’s guts, and it’s poorer for it.”

Review: CounterSpy packs the style but not the drama of spy fiction’s best

poison303:

Punk…the pinball machine. Produced by Gottlieb, year unknown. Apparently the company wanted to feature the names of various (great) bands, but never got permission from the bands themselves, so the playing field is decorated with graffiti-style tags for “The Clas,” “Sex Pist” and the “ead Bo.” Note persuasive ad pitch: “Not many teenagers will pass up the chance to try Punk. Feature it to build traffic in your location.”