"No Final Fantasy game has been so committed to loneliness as Final Fantasy VI, though, which is strange considering it has the largest cast of colorful world-saving heroes. Stranger still, they fail to save much of anything, and the world ends, at least for a while. But the World Of Ruin isn’t a place for nihilistic moping or stoic melodrama, though there are dollops of both here and there. Final Fantasy VI uses its gutted world to explore how people overcome failure and loss to build hope in new lives.”

Final Fantasy VI explores human pain through its shattered geography

"Because it often takes time to perceive the subtleties of a work, nostalgia can deepen rather than cheapen the past. Mario Kart 8 is informed by this more fulfilling sort of nostalgia: the kind that seeks to go deeper. The developers clearly studied their predecessors’ work to get a nuanced understanding of track design, competitive balance, and racing rhythm. The result is a sequel that refines Mario Kart with grace and attention to detail—a game that relies partly on fandom but nonetheless shines on its own merits.”

Review: Mario Kart 8 is the best Mario Kart ever

"The game is repressed—bland and familiar, taking few chances, as if it were made under the oppressive conditions that it depicts. It’s not a bad game at all, and that’s regrettable in a way, because at least a bad game might be a thought-provoking failure. Instead, Watch Dogs is a slightly above-average open-world quest whose defining trait is its utter normality.”

Review: Watch Dogs takes a great idea and bludgeons it with normality

afternoonyez:

Get In the Scrap (1944)
Originally founded by Milton Bradley himself, the Milton Bradley Company produced board games throughout the late 19th and most of the 20th centuries. Hard times began to affect the firm during the Great Depression years but a new era began when a new president, James A. Shea, cleaned out old inventory and dramatically cut the number of board games the firm printed and marketed. During World War II, the firm shifted production away from games to manufacture a special universal joint utilized by certain military aircraft. It also produced at least one wartime-themed board game, 1944’s Get In The Scrap. Billed as “The Game with a Patriotic Purpose,” Get In The Scrap involved players racing to see who could move their “carload of scrap” to a melting furnace first. The game also featured a printed instruction sheet which includes a “Scrap Quiz,” questions and answers about the importance and usefulness of scrap recycling. “7,700 average aluminum pots and pans will provide aluminum for one pursuit plane.”
Source: The Strong
High-res

afternoonyez:

Get In the Scrap (1944)

Originally founded by Milton Bradley himself, the Milton Bradley Company produced board games throughout the late 19th and most of the 20th centuries. Hard times began to affect the firm during the Great Depression years but a new era began when a new president, James A. Shea, cleaned out old inventory and dramatically cut the number of board games the firm printed and marketed. During World War II, the firm shifted production away from games to manufacture a special universal joint utilized by certain military aircraft. It also produced at least one wartime-themed board game, 1944’s Get In The Scrap. Billed as “The Game with a Patriotic Purpose,” Get In The Scrap involved players racing to see who could move their “carload of scrap” to a melting furnace first. The game also featured a printed instruction sheet which includes a “Scrap Quiz,” questions and answers about the importance and usefulness of scrap recycling. “7,700 average aluminum pots and pans will provide aluminum for one pursuit plane.”

Source: The Strong