gameological

Showing 273 posts tagged gameological

"He’s malleable, squishy, and moldable, a character that’s both lovable and deeply functional. Sakurai’s pink puff slots logically into almost any role, whether it’s deeply traditional or playfully experimental, making him a perfect icon for Nintendo. The company’s built an empire on indulging its oddest and safest impulses simultaneously. Kirby isn’t the face of Nintendo. He’s not Mario or Pikachu, but his 22-year career embodies Nintendo’s appealing creative spirit, vacillating between staid routine and weird experimentation."

For Our Consideration: Kirby embodies the best and worst of Nintendo’s malleable creative spirit

"The apocalypse plan is a strong fantasy. Real life is overflowing with decisions, the vast majority of them are totally inconsequential but consuming all the same. “What do I have for dinner?” occupies the same space as “What do I do with my life?” Apocalyptic fantasy isn’t about the end of the world. It’s a fantasy about clarity. When the only choice is to live or die, survive those ravenous zombies or cure this impossible plague, the nauseating paralysis of indecision disappears. Gods Will Be Watching lays bare the fallacy of the fantasy in its six chapters of do-or-die personal apocalypses. Just because everything’s ending doesn’t mean that making decisions is any easier or more pleasurable.”

Review: Gods Will Be Watching lays bare the brutal reality of apocalyptic fantasy


"There’s certainly nothing wrong with the Fruit Ninjas or Angry Birds of the world, but it’s 2014. Games have proven themselves capable of grappling with controversial, adult themes in interesting new ways. Sure, not every game that deals with serious issues works well, but they should at least have the opportunity to succeed or fail.”

—For Our Consideration: Apple’s hypocritical App Store policies infantilize games
Illustration by Nick Wanserski High-res

"There’s certainly nothing wrong with the Fruit Ninjas or Angry Birds of the world, but it’s 2014. Games have proven themselves capable of grappling with controversial, adult themes in interesting new ways. Sure, not every game that deals with serious issues works well, but they should at least have the opportunity to succeed or fail.”

For Our Consideration: Apple’s hypocritical App Store policies infantilize games

Illustration by Nick Wanserski

This weekend, the world’s best fighting-game players will gather in Las Vegas for Evo, the biggest tournament of the year. Here’s our in-depth viewer’s guide for Evo novices, breaking down—with the help of a few fighting-game experts—the eight games at the event, including the stories and players you can expect to see if you decide to tune in.  

A viewer’s guide to Evo, the year’s biggest fighting-game tournament

"Humanity, technology, and our accretion of miscellaneous stuff are compared unfavorably to the emptiness of the natural world. In later levels, twisted transmission towers and power lines invade the fields, dragging nature’s serenity into darkness and scorching some of your flower petals if they come into contact with the structures. The only technologies the game doesn’t hold in contempt are those that coexist with their natural surroundings, like wind turbines. On the whole, though, humanity and our inventions are stifling and malignant."

Our series on emptiness in games concludes with a look at thatgamecompany’s Flower.

"Axiom Verge stands apart from the retro revival crowd by looking beyond the design and aesthetic sensibilities of classic games. Happ and his creation have a reverence for the sense of the unknown that surrounded video games during their infancy. It was a time where a game’s every secret wasn’t immediately laid bare on the Internet, and we didn’t fully understand that a glitch was usually just a glitch rather than a carefully hidden secret. Axiom Verge would be promising even if it were nothing but a loving, detailed take on Metroid, but this additional layer channels a passion for some of video games’ long-lost mystery.” 

This Could Be Good: Axiom Verge’s love of glitches makes it more than just a Metroid lookalike