gameological

Showing 252 posts tagged gameological

FRACT OSC drops players into a wide expanse of alien environment that has long been abandoned and lifeless, a land fallen victim to the fate O’Shaughnessy warned against when writing that kingdoms would be directionless and forgotten without imaginative people to tell their stories. There are traces of a once-flourishing society—beacons and citadels, elaborate machines and imaginative architecture—but they are silent, having lain dormant for longer than we know. In the awakening of these monuments, the player becomes a music maker.”

—Review: FRACT OSC asks players to reawaken a world with song

"But Link’s Awakening is not so black-and-white. Link doesn’t save the world at the end of his 1993 Game Boy misadventure. He simply wakes up, a dreamer troubled by nightmares, and like any figure from a dream—whether they’re just some Jungian archetype or just so much mental debris—it’s not clear he’s doing the right thing.”

Link’s Awakening is what happens when Zelda trades heroism for the murky morality of dreams


“Riven is still careful to let you investigate the realm in your own time. The fleeting glimpses of humanity, though, naturally create an urge to meet some of these folks. Why won’t they be your friend? That’s for you to figure out. The emptiness that was taken as a matter of fact in Myst is part of the puzzle in Riven; it enriches the tensions of the game.”

—Our latest “Special Topics In Gameology” series is about emptiness in games. Myst uses it to calm you; its sequel, Riven, uses it to provoke you. High-res

Riven is still careful to let you investigate the realm in your own time. The fleeting glimpses of humanity, though, naturally create an urge to meet some of these folks. Why won’t they be your friend? That’s for you to figure out. The emptiness that was taken as a matter of fact in Myst is part of the puzzle in Riven; it enriches the tensions of the game.”

—Our latest “Special Topics In Gameology” series is about emptiness in games. Myst uses it to calm you; its sequel, Riven, uses it to provoke you.


"It’s difficult to describe the emotions raging inside as I shoot my way through an unending string of goombas on my way out of Hoboken. Under normal circumstances, the extreme violence of shooting games leaves me feeling numb. Super mutants. Aliens. The Russians. I have nothing personal against any of these entities. It’s just a game, lining up heads to crosshairs and racking up points. But this one hits close to home. I feel like an avenging angel for the 99 percent. That is, the 99 percent of New Jersey residents who are not tracksuit-wearing assholes."

—On The Level: Max Payne 3 provides catharsis for a Jersey kid who’s sick of the ridicule High-res

"It’s difficult to describe the emotions raging inside as I shoot my way through an unending string of goombas on my way out of Hoboken. Under normal circumstances, the extreme violence of shooting games leaves me feeling numb. Super mutants. Aliens. The Russians. I have nothing personal against any of these entities. It’s just a game, lining up heads to crosshairs and racking up points. But this one hits close to home. I feel like an avenging angel for the 99 percent. That is, the 99 percent of New Jersey residents who are not tracksuit-wearing assholes."

On The Level: Max Payne 3 provides catharsis for a Jersey kid who’s sick of the ridicule

"Mob mentality tries to squash anything outside of itself, even when that outgroup is a legion of superheroes protecting the majority’s existence. But people just want to feel accepted. Most of us desire to be part of something bigger than ourselves while remaining unique and beautiful in our own right. It’s those sort of existential dilemmas and connection to the disenfranchised that makes X-Men great, yet despite dozens of forays into video games, we’ve yet to see that human side of the comic make the trip. It might not be an X-Men game by name, but InFamous: Second Son is the closest anyone has come.”

Review: InFamous: Second Son is a great X-Men game in everything but name


"On the Wii’s version of The Bachelor, optimism is only as powerful as your trigger finger. Each round is divided into a series of mini-games that stand in for the television show’s dates as seamlessly as a Teddy Ruxpin doll might stand in for your therapist. They are simple exercise that test one of five basic motor functions, repeating themselves in different situations but essentially boiling down to the same patterns. (Hey, just like real dating!)”

—The Bachelor video game simulates the most miserable parts of dating High-res

"On the Wii’s version of The Bachelor, optimism is only as powerful as your trigger finger. Each round is divided into a series of mini-games that stand in for the television show’s dates as seamlessly as a Teddy Ruxpin doll might stand in for your therapist. They are simple exercise that test one of five basic motor functions, repeating themselves in different situations but essentially boiling down to the same patterns. (Hey, just like real dating!)”

The Bachelor video game simulates the most miserable parts of dating