zelda

Showing 32 posts tagged zelda

This week’s Gameological Q&A comes from reader Christopher Arp:

I was recently bragging to some friends that I had never been truly frightened by a game. Sure, any game can make me jump with a loud noise or sudden visual. But deep, creeping fear? That’s less likely. Not even Dead Space—a game that creates suspense more than anything approaching terror—gets to me. But then I remembered an ancient, excellent PC game called The Dark Eye. Eyeless clay-looking characters? Playable Edgar Allan Poe stories? Bone-chilling voice acting? My bowels, they tremble at the memory. What games, if any, have terrified you?

Our writers weighed in, and now we want to hear from you.
—Gameological Q&A: What games have truly terrified you? High-res

This week’s Gameological Q&A comes from reader Christopher Arp:

I was recently bragging to some friends that I had never been truly frightened by a game. Sure, any game can make me jump with a loud noise or sudden visual. But deep, creeping fear? That’s less likely. Not even Dead Space—a game that creates suspense more than anything approaching terror—gets to me. But then I remembered an ancient, excellent PC game called The Dark Eye. Eyeless clay-looking characters? Playable Edgar Allan Poe stories? Bone-chilling voice acting? My bowels, they tremble at the memory. What games, if any, have terrified you?

Our writers weighed in, and now we want to hear from you.

Gameological Q&A: What games have truly terrified you?

"But Link’s Awakening is not so black-and-white. Link doesn’t save the world at the end of his 1993 Game Boy misadventure. He simply wakes up, a dreamer troubled by nightmares, and like any figure from a dream—whether they’re just some Jungian archetype or just so much mental debris—it’s not clear he’s doing the right thing.”

Link’s Awakening is what happens when Zelda trades heroism for the murky morality of dreams